Four Rules for a Hero

I’ve been having a hard time trying to stay disciplined each and every day with rules I set up. Below I am going to drop and edit some lifestyle rules and ideas that I vow never to falter on. Whether it comes to food, exercise, love, family and other facets of personal health. Finding it hard to stay tried and true in multiple facets of life is difficult – I am  going to search to find MY OWN way to be the best version of me.

How can I promise others to find themselves if I truly can’t hold myself true to my best?

Promises to myself as I build this blog:

1)Be an example – Get your health right. Be proud to say you set a great example. You are a reflection of the world you portray, I want mine to reflect love, fun and an infectious curiosity.

2)Be grateful – don’t just focus on the proper way to program, lift, approach life. I want my family to know how much I care about them. My friends, my wife, my clients. And all the people they touch. Work on appreciation each and every day. Let others know how much they mean to you.

3)Become your own success story – Going from a faltering, difficult and emotional case, to a disciplined mind who doesn’t falter in morality, attitude and become a beacon of success who inspires others.

4)Have fun – Five years down the road I am going to look back at this and thank myself for beginning something and truly sticking to it. This whole life thing is meant to be fun – we’re all meant to have some kind of an impact on others – I really like to have fun. I like to play games, I like to play sports, I like to compete. There is something about just getting out there and playing with others.

 

‘Sport Specific Training’

A huge question a lot of folks think they have the answer to in the health industry…how do I get better at my sport?

Each answer is as unique as the next. What are the demands of your sport? What level are you currently working at? What are your weaknesses? What are your strengths?

#1: Define your training goals

Apparently this is all deemed strength training for boxers. It includes enlisting a dweeb wearing yoga pants and a dad hat. From the very get go, you’ve got the guy walking on a treadmill with stretch bands coming out of every orifice demanding that he jazzercize his way to the middleweight belt. If you’re trying to get your athlete better at his sport, let him play his sport. Let him condition in his sport. Let him work on technique, do some sparring. Don’t hoist your client on you shoulders while he balances on a pair of TRX handles when you’ve got a perfectly good box literally within walking distance. This is creating an unnecessary stress in the risk/reward factor in your client’s training and detracting them from what should be their focus – training hard to get better outside of the gym.

‘Strength has never been a weakness’

Rule #2: Respect and train the hell out of your weaknesses

This montage put together highlights not only a horrific display of cringeworthy training – not just half chub he sports throughout his training but completely denouncing the importance of anything in isolation. His definition of function while training is offensive in that you shouldn’t be perform the movement without good technique. ‘Training’ is not about only doing big compound movements to get stronger in what he defines as a ‘functional form’. Don’t get me wrong, compound movement progression is a big part of getting strong.  Louie Simmons doesn’t limit his lifters to only squat, bench and deadlift. You have to respect your body and respect your sport. If you are a grappler, your body is going to show it. If you’re a swimmer, your body will show it. The stress placed upon your body inside the gym should complement what you do outside of it. Don’t get so wrapped up in lifting weights that you forget about your primary focus – becoming better at your sport.

 

Stay away from the bullshit

Strength Forum

Yo –

A couple of good articles. And random Goose ramblings. This is the first morning in a while I have had some free time. And why not dish out some Goosethoughts?

First, the deadlift. A big thing Poliquin talks about in the attached article is the progression of the lift itself. For newer folks, setting up is huge. Making sure to get the right position and really finding the sweet spot in terms of distance from the bar. Reset after each rep to build pattern. In terms of full body recruitment, there aren’t many better exercises out there. I think his idea behind low back training is one that we all sort of ‘forget’. He approaches the idea of high volume deadlifts which I am not a huge fan of – mostly because I’d rather throw in some other type of hinging movement like a kettlebell swing. At the same time, I realize high volume deadlift is just something I haven’t done a lot of with my clients. Other than at Crossfit. And that’s all I’m going to say about that…

In our setting we deal with folks who are a little more frail and have underlying issues with the low back. At the same time, we’ve gotta load it to make it stronger…The whole idea of loading to a therapeutic dose is our goal. What number of sets/reps/weight is going to give our clients the best room to get stronger in the next week? I’ve found that every person has to load the deadlift differently…most folks with a neutral spine, some in slight lumbar flexion, some wider stance, some narrow. Some have to squat! The idea is that they’re going to be doing it anyway at home – putting on their shoes, picking up the trash, etc. For folks who have a hard time lifting the weight from a patterning/mobility standpoint, use a higher surface to lift from while cuing hip extension with a neutral/slightly flexed spine if necessary. We need to pick things up from the ground.

I also think the following is one of the biggest things fitness professionals miss out on the most. So much time outside of the gym is spent not thinking about doing things with ‘perfect form’. Of course we want to train perfect but realistically, when Client X goes down to pick up her dog’s crap, she won’t be thinking about pushing her hips back, bracing through her stomach and maintaining a proper Lat position. Nah, she’s just thinking about picking up the poop.  So why not train in these ranges? Not all the time, but developing stronger bodies in all planes of movement and motion will help her develop strength even in the ‘crap form’ positions thus decreasing the amount of stress on the joints in the crap ranges.

Sometimes we keep our more challenging clients in a little bubble because we put an emphasis on practicing perfect but it is NECESSARY to prepare ourselves for the unexpected.

http://main.poliquingroup.com/ArticlesMultimedia/Articles/Article/1068/Ten_Rules_for_Mastering_the_Deadlift_.aspx

Without further ado, here are ten rules for mastering the deadlift.

 

For our more ‘advanced’ groups. Different ways to work the chin up. A lot of good information in here in terms of grip and what is being worked throughout the movement.

http://www.strengthsensei.com/resource-charles-poliquin-compilation-of-chin-up-tips/

STRENGTH SENSEI Official Website for Charles R Poliquin : Strength Training, Nutrition, Articles, Books, Motivation, Supplementation

Personal Discipline

Ahoy, hoy.

The last couple of days have been great. Great days at work, great news from home and a lot of huge life changes in the works.

I’ll start with something about my life. A week ago I vowed to the wife from my heart of hearts that I wanted to get healthy and ripped and shredded again. It really isn’t a matter of what to do because I know. I’m not in the worst shape ever but I need to hold myself to my best. Less is a disappointment.

 

It’s a matter of saying ‘get the f away from me as I get healthy’. Hardest part of this whole game, really. Over the weekend, I veered away from this gluten free thing (I really thought it was a fad but I feel VERY different having abstained from it for a week). Fun action point: Eat gluten free for a week. I mean really. Stay away from it. Then eat nothing but gluten on day 8. If you have any sensitivity, you will know. Not because you feel so great on the days you eat gluten free. But on the day you eat gluten, you’ll feel bloated and sloppy. Or you won’t.  But it’s worth a shot.

Also thought I had a good plan for exercise and nutrition this week solid and in place but Super Bowl weekend threw me off a bit from the nutrition side of things. Need to nail it back down and stray away from excusing my health. With that said, I’ve had some great workouts at the gym and have been getting much better at volleyball. All positive, very proud and making progress.

Had a GREAT phone call with my ma and pa over the weekend – they actually called me excited and thrilled about crushing their goal over the last couple of weeks. They have been weighing in and drinking water. Nothing but positivity and fun coming from this so far!

Goal for the next week:

  1. Keep things positive and their eyes on what they have achieved in the last few weeks. (self appreciation and reflection)
  2. Maintain water intake, weigh ins (medium barrier for resistance)
  3. This week I want to give them the keys, they have been doing well and need a little positive reinforcement internally – What do they think is their biggest hurdle in terms of eating? Are they snarfing ice cream at midnight every night? Are they willing to give up the biggest culprit without replacing it with something crappy?

Overall, very pleased with how things are going.

Life is moving really fast right now…

UH Strength Coach’s Clinic

Just got back from the Hawaii Strength Coach’s Clinic.

Lessons learned:

1: Earn your carbohydrates.

  • Your body can survive without carbohydrates. It can’t survive without protein and fat. If you are trying to lose fat, cut carbs and add in as you increase your activity.
  • Categorizing your carbs
    • Level 1: One meal a week. Once you get to a respectable BF% then…
    • Level 2: One meal a week + Postworkout carbs. Once you get to your desired BF% and activity levels, increase activity to accommodate for
    • Level 3: One meal a week + Postworkout Carbs + Carbs at Lunch.
    • Level 4: One meal a week + Postworkout Carbs + Carbs at Lunch and Dinner. This is for folks who bust ass/exercise 15+ hours per week

2: Being strong has never been a weakness

TED Talk with Amy Cuddy

  • Strength has become ostracized. Being strong is not a weakness
  • Full range every repetition
  • Getting stronger doesn’t mean do circuits all the time
  • Strengthen upper back to offset shoulder internal rotators and increase testosterone
    • Deadlift
    • Chinups
      • Add weight as soon as possible.
      • Stay below 6 repetitions for strength
      • Most intense exercise for nervous system (highest dropoff of any exercise after a set to fatigue)
      • 5 second eccentric
    • Hi-row
      • Looking for upper back strength – Works External rotators
        • Lat work strengthens internal rotators
      • Aids in opening the chest and releasing testosterone
    • Elbow Flexion
      • Triggers sprinting
      • Responsible for bottom of pullup/chinup

3: Cuing the squat

  • Work high bar squats to strengthen low bar squat
  • Full range
  • Set lats
  • Point toes out
  • Bend knees
  • Open up groin
  • Work your back to strengthen the squat

 

 

 

Week 1 down, success

Yo, Fresh weekend. Crushed it at the Hawaii Strength Coaches clinic.

I have taken on the stress of trying to help improve my family’s health. My dad and mom are awesome. But they both also love to hang out and eat good food.

This week went really well with the family. They called me excited and stupid ecstatic about drinking water…it was great to hear them so positive about the first week.

It was a great start to their adventure and giving them a low-barrier goal to attain was a fantastic first goal to attain. So I think I have that figured out. I’ll detail their success below!

Week 1: Drink 80 ounces of H2O per day…Success!!

They were positive, happy and actually asked me about the next goal for the week. Mom had suggested that they walk three times in the next week for their goal, I honestly don’t even want to go there yet!

Exercise is a big barrier and I want them to make sure they’ve got it going full steam ahead before they really have to commit to anything more than a couple minutes out of their day…which leads me to week 2’s goal: weigh in every morning. My rationale is that is they want to get started with that early on, go for it! I am excited for them and want them to succeed.

I didn’t ask for their weight, I didn’t ask for their end goal…that is 100% up to them right now. I want to see what kind of an affect weighing in each day has on them without talking about weight loss. The biggest part of it all to me is seeing that they hold themselves accountable – creating good habits for them and letting them see success early on to build momentum down the road.

So far my parents have accomplished the following:

Weel 1: 80 ounces of water everyday!

 

What I want them to accomplish:

1)Reduce their risk for heart disease, cancer, diabetes (ie. help them build habits to live a longer life)

2)Feel healthy (reduce BP, cholesterol meds)

3)Be strong and mobile for life – not worried too much about wiping their butts when they get old.

Daily Reminders

4276182Yo!

 

A client of mine suggested a daily reminder to get him moving…had this genius idea to automate it through text rather than forcing myself to do it everyday…I guess I am a lazy guy…but the thought is to send him something every week reminding him to drink water/exercise more/get his life together.

I am going to go with SMS Scheduler, I sent out a few messages – although there have been a couple hiccups with the program shutting down, it is working!

I plan on talking to dad today. Has been a long time coming…

Edit: Just talked to Pops, went pretty well. He seems a bit hesitant and nervous about me asking this of him. I don’t know if it was just his perception of what I am asking of him or if he is really just kind of like ‘let’s do it’, but I am excited he agreed. It wasn’t too big of a deal for him but for my mom, she seemed hesitant and really reliant on him.

I suggested they set a specific goal – dad said 1 pound a week for 50 weeks.

GOOD! Goal is set.

Happy scale is an application on iPhone that he can hold him accountable.